This one began with the syncopated drums (Ableton 64 Pad Kit Jazz) and not much else of a thought behind it, though a few electric piano chords with PureMagnetik Berlin Mark Two kind of pointed the way. I added the usual 80s Epiphone Embassy II bass, tracked a bit more of the electric piano, and then finally tracked pedal steel. I'd tuned the 9th and 10th strings down a bit, from their usual E9 values (so the tuning is now A C# E F# G# B E G# D# F#), and that gives me a bit more of the notes I want on the low side of the board. (I track pedal steel with a Moyo passive volume pedal.)

Inline processing: a bit of Max Humanizer on the drums, Glue compressor on the pedal steel, and the usual EQ-8 on bass. The usual full-chain multi band compression on the output.

Sends: Ableton Echo, convolution reverb, and Valhalla Supermassive.

Title comes from NGC 70, a distant spiral galaxy.

Kedbreak136 · 141 days ago

Very nice groove you have there. The slide guitar is so smooth! It is just perfect.

More submissions by onezero for Weekly Music 2021

I'd done some rhythmic composition with guitar and bass, and...it didn't seem that interesting. So Sunday evening I did a few improvisations with home-built Res-O-Glas guitar, Moyo passive volume, and my eight-delay Max/MSP patch with Hainbach's Wires (for grit and warble) and convolution reverb. I recorded that to the drive, and brought it into Ableton for fixing levels a bit.

Title this week refers to NGC 90, a spiral galaxy interacting with NGC 93 to form the galaxy pair Arp 65.

This one started with a sparse and syncopated rhythm I imagined, and grew a bit organically from there: first vibes (removed) and PureMagnetik Berlin electric piano, and then PureSalem Mendiola guitar lines (straight into the Focusrite). Finally, a pass with Epiphone bass. My timing is very loose on this one.

There's the usual processing here: Drums are the 64 Pad Kit Jazz with Humanizer. Bass gets the usual EQ-8 rolloff. One guitar gets high-pass Auto-Filter with drive. Sends: one echo and two convolution reverbs (one large, one small). Wide & Warm audio effect rack preset on the output.

The title comes from NGC 89, a peculiar spiral in Robert's Quartet.

Kind of a late edit on this, but it was a busy weekend. This one's drums (Ableton Acoustified Kit 02), two tracks of Epiphone Embassy II bass (one with EQ-8 low-end rolloff, and the other with Auto-Filter high-pass, played higher on the neck), and two tracks of home-built Res-O-Glas guitar--one through Montreal Assembly Count to Five (the backwards-sounding one) and one straight to the Focusrite, though with some low- and high-pass Auto-Filter with drive.

Sends: one echo (with LFO band-pass Auto-Filter in front), one convolution reverb (with high-pass Auto-Filter in front), and Valhalla Supermassive. There's Wide&Warm preset compression on the stereo output.

Title comes from this week's number, counting from last year.

A very collage-like piece, tracked Friday night and Saturday. I started with an odd drum track with Ableton's 64 Pad Kit Special, added a few keys with PureMagnetik Rhodes (Berlin), and then tracked several loops with bass (new D'Addario half-round strings replacing the flats; there should be a touch more high-end) and PureSalem Mendiola through Reuss RF-01 and Vox Wah. The result? Kinda dense, maybe.

Sends: two convolution reverbs (with high-pass in front), Valhalla Supermassive, and Echo with modulated Auto-Filter in front, as a pouring-one-out in honor of Lee "Scratch" Perry.

Inlines: Max Humanizer on drums, EQ-8 for low-end rolloff on bass (still), some high-pass Auto-Filter and Cabinet on guitars. Wide & Warm audio effects rack preset on the stereo mix.

Title comes from 87 being the international calling code for (apparently) phone calls to Inmarsat.

This one's a bit of a departure: just five tracks of Univox Effie in Fahey C tuning (dropped to B), three of which go through the Montreal Assembly Count to Five.

There are two sends, both convolution reverbs (one of which has low-end rolloff with Auto-Filter). One track has that same in-line high-pass, and three of them have auto-pan. There's an audio effect rack with the Wide & Warm preset on the output buss.

The title comes from the device number of the lockout relay--86--which may be the source of using 86 as a slang term for canceling something.

A friend sold me his Montreal Assembly Count to Five pedal, so that's featured on this week's track. I did a few ambient improvs with that (with home-built Res-O-Glas and CMI E-200 guitar strung with Nashville high tuning), and added Ableton's 64 Pad Kit Jazz drums, and a pass with 80s Epiphone Embassy II bass.

Sends: two convolution reverbs and one echo.

Title comes from the asterism with this name containing M85.

Tracked over the weekend, but I didn't have much of a chance to arrange it until Monday, and it required a bit of listening for editing. I'd started with some syncopated drum patterns (sounds from Ableton's 64 Pad Kit Jazz), and then I put down some sparse guitar with the PureSalem Mendiola through the Balls Effects KWB, and then bass. On listening, it made sense to move some of the guitar tracks to a different channel, so this ended up being a four-track thing.

There's a slight difference to how I'm approaching the bassline, particularly in the bridge, which makes this a bit of a departure, I think.

Inlines: Max Humanizer on drums. Guitars got high-pass Auto-Filter with some different cutoffs and different levels of drive, along with some Glue compression and different Cabinet modelers for air. (1x12 seemed to work best here.) Bass got the usual EQ-8 low-end rolloff, but also some compression as well. The stereo mix got Ableton's Wide & Warm effect rack for compression/eq.

Sends: two convolution reverbs (one large, one small) with high-pass Auto-Filter in front. Also a channel of delay on the 3.

The title comes from hepteracts having 84 penetrant 5-faces.

Last week's piece required quite a bit of arrangement, so to get myself back on track for this week, I opted to improvise with pedal steel and my eight-delay Max/MSP patch. A few weeks ago, I added FFT pitch shift to the patch, and 50% blend of one-fifth down is very satisfying. So there's a lot of that here

The signal chain going in is pedal steel > Balls Effects KWB (a fuzz/boost), Vox Wah, and Moyo passive volume. Inside the patch, there's the FFT, a VST of AudioThing Reels, the delay lines, a send to a VST of AudioThing Motor, auto-pan, and convolution reverb (Huddersfield Town Hall) on the output.

The eight delay lines were set to different lengths, but they were related by calculating 12-part increments from a base of 15.5 seconds.

To keep things from becoming too austere, I added yet another convolution reverb (Fort Worden Cistern) in Live, and put Full Chain multi-band eq/compression on the output.

The title comes from 83 being a safe prime.

A very late upload by my usual schedule (though not "late" for this streak). All the tracking took place this past weekend, but arrangement wasn't something I could get to until last evening. My usual method of working on these is this:

  1. put up a rhythm, and maybe add keyboards against it
  2. play bass or guitar against it to get some loops
  3. play guitar or bass against those to get more loops
  4. move those snippets around into a structure
  5. adjust levels, add automation/randomization, adjust sends, finishing touches

It was the same thing here, but the pieces weren't quite fitting together until fairly late. Some of the not-quite-fitting might be from A/D latency, which seems to tack a bit higher than the setting when I first open Ableton. It's most notable on bass here, though I did warp some late notes into place when they seemed much later than "feel."

Drums: Ableton 64 Pad Kit Special, with Max Humanizer and 80-90% probability on most drum hits, though 1, 2, and 4 get 100%.

Keys: PureMagnetik Mark Two Berlin

Bass: 80s Epiphone Embassy II, with EQ-8 low-end reduction

Guitars: PureSalem Mendiola through Balls Effects KWB. One channel's mostly neck pickup with the other being mostly bridge.

Sends: Ableton Echo plugin and convolution reverb (BM7 Clear Ambience) with high-pass Auto-Filter in front.

Wide & Warm preset audio effect rack on the stereo output

Title comes from radio emissions from an unknown object in M82.

Here's a piece I started late in the week, with no plan in mind. I started with a beat that wasn't particularly clear or strong, relocated the 1, and then worked up some variations. The kit: Ableton's 64 Pads Dub Techno Kit, with 90% randomization on a lot of beats, and a touch of Max Humanizer, as well as echo send on the 2 and 4.

Bass: 80s Epiphone Embassy II, direct to the Focusrite A/D--there are two tracks of bass here, one higher on the neck (panned slightly left) and one lower (center). The higher one got Auto-Filter high-pass, while the lower one got EQ-8 with the low end rolled off 6dB, rather than cut entirely.

Guitar: home-built Res-O-Glas with Lace Alumitones, straight into the Focusrite. There's AudioThing Wires on this, 50% blend.

Sends: Ableton Echo, one convolution reverb, and Valhalla Supermassive on the guitar.

Title comes from M81, a Grand Design spiral galaxy.

I'd thought I was going to do something more abstract this week, though my bass- and guitar-playing sessions ended up making it kind of funky. So it's a groove.

Drums: Ableton Fairfax kit, which sounds interestingly synthetic, but also has some impact. I added a touch of Max Humanizer and gave it some room-sized convolution reverb, and automated delay send on the 2 and 4.

Bass: 80s Epiphone Embassy II, on p-pickup. Low-end rolloff with EQ-8, and then another track also of bass, but in the higher register, with high-pass Auto-Filter with a bit of drive.

Guitar: PureSalem Mendiola on the bridge mini-humbucker, through Balls Effects KWB. One got room-sized convolution reverb send, and the other got a much larger hall send.

Title comes from the function of the old 80-type vacuum tube.

This one goes up late for me, though not late for this year's streak. This one is another all-Danelectro-baritone piece, which started with syncopated drums (64 Pad Kit Jazz), got a keyboard line (PureMagnetik Berlin Rhodes), and then a bunch of baritone parts (basslines, chords, lead figures).

My initial pass at collaging these together...just didn't work. So I let it sit a day or so, and reassembled it from sections that I knew worked. Now it's kind of a summer jam.

Drums got some Max Humanizer and some randomization, as well as increased drive from Drum Buss. A couple guitar lines got high-pass auto-filter with drive, and a few got the Glue Compressor. Baritone bass got a bit of EQ-8 low-end rolloff, but not like my real bass does.

Sends: one room-sized convolution reverb (with high-pass auto-filter in front), Delay, Echo, and Valhalla Supermassive.

The stereo mix got an audio effect rack, on the Master Wide & Warm setting--a bit of a change from my usual, but it sounded better here.

Title comes from the number 79 being a Happy prime, Lucky prime, and Sexy prime (with 73).

I didn't begin this one until Saturday evening, with a sense of doing something sparse--a bit like Bark Psychosis, though this did end up going in another direction. Having checked out a few Ableton Loop sessions, I also thought to use the clip-level probability interface for the drums and keys--in these cases, usually the first beat is at 100%, but subsequent notes were at 75-80% probability.

Drums are Ableton's 64 Pad Kit Special, with a bit of Max Humanizer, and sends to convolution reverbs.

Bass is the usual 80s Epiphone Embassy II, with some EQ-8 low-end rolloff, and sends to the reverbs for air.

The keyboard is LABS soft piano, with Auto-Pan and a send to an Echo plugin.

Guitars are 2008 Danelectro baritone on both pickups, with inline high-pass Auto-Filter with drive, and sends to the reverbs.

The title comes from the fact that this is week 78 since the beginning of 2020, so...78 rpm records came to mind.

Happy halfway-point!

I'd had a thought of doing something a bit sparser this week, and while this one's more dense than I was thinking, some of the initial inspiration remains. The rhythms are mostly very syncopated, and are done with the usual 64 Pad Kit Jazz with an automated delay send and Max Humanizer.

For guitar, I used my home-built Res-O-Glas, and started with the little single-note line, and then responded to it with the chordal tremolo guitar (using a pedal from Mike Carey in Milwaukee), with a send to Valhalla Supermassive. I went back and forth between trem and non-trem channels, to do leads in response to rhythm, and rhythm in response to leads. The clean lead channel had a send to a large convolution reverb--spacious, but not quite as harmonic as the Valhalla.

For bass, I did the usual 80s Epiphone Embassy II, on the P-pickup. It got some low-end rolloff with EQ-8, and a send to a smaller convolution reverb (as did the drums).

The title comes from the use of the number 77 as a password at the Swedish border during WWII.

Another quick-recording/long-editing piece. This one started just as some drum syncopation, with a few atmospheric keys...and then kind of came together with bass and guitar.

Drums: Ableton 64 Pad Kit Jazz, with Max Humanizer
Keys: PureMagnetik Berlin electric piano
Guitar: PureSalem Mendiola through Vox Wah; one channel with Auto-Filter drive
Bass: 80s Epiphone Embassy II with EQ-8 low-end rolloff

Sends: convolution reverb (with high-pass Auto-Filter in front), Echo, Valhalla Supermassive

Master full-chain audio effect rack on the output.

Title comes from Messier 76, the Little Dumbbell Nebula.

This one took a few turns after I'd started working on it. I'd started with a few syncopated drum parts (Ableton's 64 Pad Kit Jazz), and thought there'd be a moody atmospheric thing happening. Then I picked up the Danelectro baritone, and a bassline came out that had some attitude to it. I put a few chords to it, and then the next basslines came out with a lot of swagger. So...out with the plan. I did several more passes with the baritone, mostly straight into the board, but then cut a few leads through the Balls Effects KWB and Vox Wah, finally adding a few more through the Reuss RF-01 (and Vox Wah), which come at the end.

Inline effects: Max Humanizer and Drum Buss on the drums. Some Glue Compressor on the baritone, with some Auto-Filter with drive on the cleaner chordal baritone parts.

Sends: Delay on drums, with two different convolution reverbs (one with high-pass auto-filter to prevent boominess) on the baritone.

Title comes from their being 75 uniform polyhedra, if you omit the infinite ones.

Here's one I recorded in a few quick, improvisatory sessions, but it needed a bit of attention to edit together. My initial thought was to emphasize toms and kick, avoiding the snare if I could, and then respond to that. (There's a snare rimshot sound every so often, but no overt snare hits.)

Recording the guitar went quickly, though once I'd settled on which key I preferred, I did need to go back and record a bit more. With bass, I'd recorded a bunch of parts, and ended up throwing most of them out, going instead with lines I tracked last in arrangement view.

Guitar: PureSalem Mendiola straight into the Focusrite. (Each channel got inline Auto-Filter for drive/coloration). Bass: 80s Epiphone Embassy II (neck pickup only). EQ-8 for some low-end rolloff. Drums: Ableton 64 Pad Kit Special, with Max Humanizer.

Sends: Valhalla Supermassive, Ableton Delay, convolution reverb with Auto-Filter to roll off lows.

Title comes from the lenticular galaxy NGC 74.

Kind of a lot going on this weekend, but I thought to make a trilogy of all-baritone pieces. So here's another.

Drums: Drum Rack of Ableton's Towel Kit, with Max Humanizer. Maybe the challenge here was simplifying the drums enough to work with the guitar.

Guitars: 2008 Danelectro Baritone, no effects. Some inline Auto-Filter and Glue Compressor on the left and right channels (with cabinet on one), and a bit of EQ-8 to roll off the bass.

Sends: one Echo, one Valhalla Supermassive, and one convolution reverb.

Title comes from the number of bits in the Arecibo message.

Another rather busy week and weekend, so this one came together in a few quick sessions: one to come up with some drum beats, one with Danelectro baritone guitar for all guitar parts (three tracks--bass, rhythm, lead), and one to arrange/mix.

Drums: Ableton Drum Rack, using the Towel Kit preset rack--there was a slightly dead thump to these that I liked. There's some Max Humanizer on the drums as well (30ms).

All guitars are Danelectro baritone. The bass got a little EQ-8 to roll off extreme lows, and the lead got some Glue Compressor to control dynamics.

Sends: one Echo, one convolution reverb, and one Valhalla Supermassive.

The title comes from there being several religious sites and traditions mentioning 72 temples. There's kind of a road-trip vibe to this one, I think.

A crowded weekend--I still tracked everything, but didn't get the pieces arranged until Monday evening. (The way the deadlines fall this year, that works out.) It's a short piece, a bit sloppy (trying to fiddle with latency settings here), but it has a pleasantness to it.

All Danelectro baritone guitar (the 1449 reissue from 2008) straight into the Focusrite A/D--two tracks of both pickups (lead and bass), one of just the bridge (rhythm). Drums: Ableton 64 Pad Kit Rock with Max Humanizer. Keys: Puremagnetik Mark Two Berlin.

Sends: one convolution reverb, one Echo (with LFO auto filter in front of it), Valhalla Supermassive. Multi-band full-chain on the output.

Title comes from 71 being the algebraic degree of Conway's constant, which describes a property of look-and-say sequences.

Weekly Music 2021

Write, record, and upload a new piece of music every week.

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